New Design

We are now focusing on the samples  in the lab under an improve design. The focusing is on the affects of Nitrate and Ammonia enrichment. We have replicated the Hudson River’s environment to fit our experiment. Instead of only sampling the Hudson River we are also expanding to the East River, Newtown Creek.

Successes and Downsfalls

We had two bags in our trap, and as you can see here the bag with our samples had water in it. With the additional water found in the bags, the bags acted as a weight instead of a float.

 During our last expedition we found that our set up was a success! Unfontany since our samples were moved and the floatation device was filled with water over time, the samples did not receive sunlight. Therefore, the samples were tarnished.  We intend to improve our setup  next week.

New Designs !

This time we tried two designs, that without the lobster trap and that with it.  Both setups have our bottles, but we want to view how stable each environment may be from surrounding challenges .

On the left is our columns in the bag, while on the right is our columns in a bag, and then in the lobster trap.

Positives to both designs  

Bag: 1. A great floating device 

Lobster Trap: 1. Prevents outside sources from harming columns. 

North Brooklyn Boating Club

On Saturday, Professor Levandowsky and I ventured to the North Brooklyn Boating Club (NBBC) , to collect our samples by canoe. We found out that there was evidence of combined sewage overflow (CSO)  in the East River when our test showed up for 0.3 ppm of ammonia.

When we got back to lab we found some warm and clam larva, but there was one thing that was stunning, we couldn’t figure it out.

Unknown sample

Hudson sampling

Shown here is the lobster trap. We inserted each bottle in the trap, tied the doors to the trap ( one of the two doors can be seen on the bottom of the photo) and then we put our line through the trap. The trap was used as a float in our experiment.

When we retrieved our bottles, we found that some were empty while others were filled up. On the left is our control, and in comparison to the bottle on the right it’s obvious that it’s missing water.

Our collections from the Hudson River are still unrecovered. We are still concentrating on our set up. The biggest obstacle is keeping our samples in the water so that the experiment can occur.  Some solutions that was thought of, were to keep our incubators in a lobster tap but that hasn’t  worked . Instead, while our bottles were in the trap were punctured and water leaked in.

Our future studies revolves around our voyage to Newtown Creek in the East River. We intend to attempt our set up there as well.

Final Project

As we dwindled down to the final days, Olive and I finally broadcasted our poster and oral presentation  at the American Museum of Natural History. Here we, along with about 20 other teams are at the Urban Barcoding Research Program.

During our presentation we showed that in our results, that out of 20 samples 16 was successfully amplified. Of the 16 samples 10 were found as algal and six as non-algal.

There were 16 successful blasts and show here there were 6 non-algal samples and 10 algal samples.  This shows that all of our samples weren't want we expected.

There were 16 successful blasts and show here there were 6 non-algal samples and 10 algal samples. This shows that all of our samples weren’t want we expected.

Of our non-algal samples most blasts were found in the Animalia kingdom.

Setting up

We are going to finally set up our experiment, where we will create a weigh that will hold our samples down in the Hudson River as it’s tied to a plank with line that’s tied on the other end  to a fence.  As our samples stay afloat we hope to have them bloom.

Professor Levandowsky displaying our sequences on the plank of wood.

Professor Levandowsky displaying our sequences on the plank of wood.